View Matching


View Matching is a fairly old technique first seriously utilised at the beginning of the millennium. Lars et al from Microsoft research exploited this technique for SQL Server 2000.

The idea is to utilise existing materialised views (or indexed views in SQL Server) for query optimisations. For example, if you query “SELECT * FROM Cars WHERE Brand=’BMW’ and PRICE BETWEEN 40,000 AND 70,000” and there is already an indexed views over the cars called v_LuxuryCars which is defined as “SELECT * FROM Cars WHERE PRICE > 40,000”, the query optimiser can exploit v_LuxuryCars for executing the query. This view can be much smaller than the base table and the query can run faster. The real beauty of exploiting materialised views will be obvious in more complex queries though.

The challenge here is how to efficiently figure out if a view can be used for the query. Indeed, if the query predicate, is a subset of the view definition predicate (like the given example; PRICE BETWEEN 40k AND 80K is a subset of PRICE > 40K). This is not straight forward since the predicates can be really complicated. For example query may have the predicate A=2 and B=2, while the view definition has the predicate A=B. In that case the inference of the predicate sub/super relationship is  not obvious).

However, this problem is well studied for relational algebra and even though Microsoft have been very active in developing View Matching techniques, it is not used in the SQL Server core, possibly for performance reasons.

The reason I am interested in view matching is that I have started a project for View Matching over IQueriable interface. I will keep you posted about the progress.

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